Author Archives: Jacqueline

Five Minute Feedback

With the popular British Academy/Leverhulme Small Grant deadline looming, I am asked to comment on several draft applications per day. My comments are surprisingly consistent as I read each new draft and give feedback using ‘track changes’: Comment (JA1) Your … Continue reading

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Posted in Writing the Case for Support | 4 Comments

Lacuna, hope and other words to avoid

Here are five common writing mistakes gleaned from a wide variety of real life grant applications: 1. Fancy synonyms such as ‘lacuna’, ‘felicitous’ and ‘finitude’ make your proposals both harder to read and harder to understand. 2. The language of … Continue reading

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One Idea – Several Projects

In Chapter 7 we talk about dealing with low success rates by creating several applications from one project idea.  Once you understand how to read and use the application template, writing up different versions of the same idea is straightforward. But … Continue reading

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Toolkit Rocks ESRC Festival

Prof. David Shemmings, Grants Factory veteran, uses techniques from the Research Funding Toolkit in his popular grant-writing events around the UK.  His workshop  yesterday, at the ESRC Research Methods Festival in Oxford, even made the Times Higher.  Find out why … Continue reading

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One line answers to tricky questions

Andrew gave me some useful tips on how to help short-listed candidates prepare for funding panel interviews (e.g. the European Research Council Starting Grant interviews this month).  I have now road tested this advice on an ERC applicant.  He tells me that he faces tomorrow’s  interview with increased confidence.  So … Continue reading

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So What?

Good grant-writers predict what their readers need to know in order to understand and support an application. This allows them to build their arguments in a smooth and compelling way. An outstanding application never leaves the reader saying ‘so what?’, … Continue reading

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